In today's linear economical system, manufacturers extract resources from the earth to make products that will soon be discarded in landfills, on the other hand, under the circular model, the production of goods operates like systems in nature, where the waste and demise of a substance becomes the food and source of growth for something new. Companies such as MUD Jeans, which is based in the Netherlands employs a leasing scheme for jeans. This Dutch company "represents a new consuming philosophy that is about using instead of owning," according to MUD's website. The concept also protects the company from volatile cotton prices. Consumers pay €7.50 a month for a pair of jeans; after a year, they can return the jeans to Mud, trade them for a new pair and start another year-long lease, or keep them. MUD is responsible for any repairs during the lease period.[43] Another ethical fashion company, Patagonia set up the first multi-seller branded store on EBay in order to facilitate secondhand sales; consumers who take the Common Threads pledge can sell in this store and have their gear listed on Patagonia.com's "Used Gear" section.[43]
There are many examples of cultural appropriation in fashion. In many instances, designers can be found using aspects of culture inappropriately, in most cases taking traditional clothing from middle eastern, African, and Hispanic culture and adding it to their runway fashion.[91] Some examples are in a 2018 Gucci runway show, white models wore Sikh headdresses, causing a lot of backlash. Victoria’s secret was also under fire for putting traditional native headdresses on their models during a lingerie runway show.
Fashion trends are influenced by several factors including cinema, celebrities, climate, creative explorations, political, economical, social and technological. Examining these factors is called a PEST analysis. Fashion forecasters can use this information to help determine growth or decline of a particular trend. Fashion trends change daily, it can not stay unchanged
There are many examples of cultural appropriation in fashion. In many instances, designers can be found using aspects of culture inappropriately, in most cases taking traditional clothing from middle eastern, African, and Hispanic culture and adding it to their runway fashion.[91] Some examples are in a 2018 Gucci runway show, white models wore Sikh headdresses, causing a lot of backlash. Victoria’s secret was also under fire for putting traditional native headdresses on their models during a lingerie runway show.
In the fashion industry, intellectual property is not enforced as it is within the film industry and music industry. Robert Glariston, an intellectual property expert, mentioned in a fashion seminar held in LA[which?] that "Copyright law regarding clothing is a current hot-button issue in the industry. We often have to draw the line between designers being inspired by a design and those outright stealing it in different places."[69] To take inspiration from others' designs contributes to the fashion industry's ability to establish clothing trends. For the past few years, WGSN has been a dominant source of fashion news and forecasts in encouraging fashion brands worldwide to be inspired by one another. Enticing consumers to buy clothing by establishing new trends is, some have argued, a key component of the industry's success. Intellectual property rules that interfere with this process of trend-making would, in this view, be counter-productive. On the other hand, it is often argued that the blatant theft of new ideas, unique designs, and design details by larger companies is what often contributes to the failure of many smaller or independent design companies.
Getting controversy right is difficult. While getting controversial on your blog is an excellent way to get your readers talking and to get blood pumping. When addressing a tough topic, you run the risk of not communicating exactly what you mean, coming off the wrong way, missing the point, offending, etc. Here, post titles are especially important. Often times because with controversy often attracts trolls, and if your post title doesn't exactly reflect your point, you run the risk that the trolls will bomb your post with nasty comments without actually reading the post, or worse, looking for a way to twist your words. This post, when I read the title, I took a deep breath. Knowing how hot this topic is, and also knowing how the body image conversation has focused on a particular body type in the past few years, I could see frustration.

Since the 1970’s, fashion models of color, especially black men and women, have experienced an increase in discrimination in the fashion industry. In the years from 1970 to 1990, black designers and models were very successful, but as the 1990’s came to an end, the fashion aesthetic changed and it did not include black models or designers.[89] In today’s fashion, black models, influencers, and designers account for one of the smallest percentages of the industry.[89] There are many theories about this lack of diversity, that it can be attributed to the economic differences usually associated with race and class, or it can reflect the differences in arts schooling given to mostly black populated schools, and also blatant racism.

Why: Of Turkish/Iranian Jewish descent, Medine kicked off her career with a blog called Boogers + Bagels. Her ironic fashion-addict asides soon had her readers rolling in the aisles, and she decided to focus on the topic full-time after a joky conversation while out shopping with a friend about how ‘man-repelling’ all the fashion-forward outfits they loved were. It’s now a male-scaring empire, providing in-depth intel: ‘The difference between Mom Jeans and Dad Jeans’, the fabulous ‘Manstagram’ – all the best fash items du jour – and fun features and style news aplenty.
Many fashion designers have come under fire over the years for what is known as tokenism. Designer or editors will add one or two members on an underrepresented group to help them appear as inclusive and diverse, and to also help them give the illusion that they have equality.[89] This idea of tokenism helps designers avoid accusations of racism, sexism, body shaming, etc.[89]
Many fashion designers have come under fire over the years for what is known as tokenism. Designer or editors will add one or two members on an underrepresented group to help them appear as inclusive and diverse, and to also help them give the illusion that they have equality.[89] This idea of tokenism helps designers avoid accusations of racism, sexism, body shaming, etc.[89]
At the beginning of the 20th century, fashion magazines began to include photographs of various fashion designs and became even more influential than in the past.[50] In cities throughout the world these magazines were greatly sought after and had a profound effect on public taste in clothing. Talented illustrators drew exquisite fashion plates for the publications which covered the most recent developments in fashion and beauty. Perhaps the most famous of these magazines was La Gazette du Bon Ton, which was founded in 1912 by Lucien Vogel and regularly published until 1925 (with the exception of the war years).[51]

Since the 1970’s, fashion models of color, especially black men and women, have experienced an increase in discrimination in the fashion industry. In the years from 1970 to 1990, black designers and models were very successful, but as the 1990’s came to an end, the fashion aesthetic changed and it did not include black models or designers.[89] In today’s fashion, black models, influencers, and designers account for one of the smallest percentages of the industry.[89] There are many theories about this lack of diversity, that it can be attributed to the economic differences usually associated with race and class, or it can reflect the differences in arts schooling given to mostly black populated schools, and also blatant racism.


Black activists and supporters used fashion to express their solidarity and support of this civil rights movement. Supporters adorned symbolic clothing, accessories and hairstyles, usually native to Africa. Politics and fashion were fused together during this time and the use of these symbolic fashion statements sent a message to America and the rest of the world that African Americans were proud of their heritage.[86] They aimed to send an even stronger message that black is beautiful and they were not afraid to embrace their identities.[86] An example would the Kente cloth, it is a brightly colored strip of cloth that is stitched and woven together to create different accessories.[86] This woven cloth of brightly colored strips of fabric became a strong symbolic representation of pride in African identity for African Americans of the 1960’s and later. It was developed into what is called a dashiki, a flowing, loose fitting, tunic style shirt. This cloth became one of the most notorious symbols of this revolution.[87]


This site is a go-to for fashion-forward women who are shopping on a budget. Not only is the site dedicated to recreating celebrity looks with cheaper options (that look very similar, if not identical!), but it also is a source for style tips and the latest trends. See an outfit you love on Chrissy Teigen? Just hop over to the site to find out how to have it without spending three months worth of paychecks.
Additionally, there is a long history of fashion in West Africa.[11] Cloth was used as a form of currency in trade with the Portuguese and Dutch as early as the 16th Century.[11] Locally produced cloth and cheaper European imports were assembled into new styles to accommodate the growing elite class of West Africans and resident gold and slave traders.[11] There was an especially strong tradition of cloth-weaving in Oyo and the areas inhabited by the Igbo people.[11]
^ Experian. (2012). Getting the most from social: An integrated marketing approach. Retrieved from www.experian.com.au/assets/social/getting-the-most-from-social.pdf in Cassidy, L. & Fitch, K. (2013) Beyond the Catwalk: Fashion Public Relations and Social Media in Australia, Asia Pacific Public Relations Journal, vol. 14, No. 1 & 2, Murdoch University.
Not only did political events make a huge impact on fashion trends but also the political figure played a critical role in forecasting the fashion trend. For example, First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy was a fashionable icon of the early 1960s who led formal dressing trend. By wearing a Chanel suit, a structural Givenchy shift dress or a soft color Cassini coat with huge buttons, it created her elegant look and led a delicate trend.[33]
Suggestions for “Gatsby” Make it punchier by shortening the post title. Also, I don't really know what “Drops” means, guessing it's another word for songs and I'm just old. Looking at this post I see a great opportunity to add in a number. It's good to be clever, but you don't want your readers Googling your post title just to find out what you mean.  “Hear Now: 14 Songs from the Great Gatsby Soundtrack” might be a better fit.

Getting controversy right is difficult. While getting controversial on your blog is an excellent way to get your readers talking and to get blood pumping. When addressing a tough topic, you run the risk of not communicating exactly what you mean, coming off the wrong way, missing the point, offending, etc. Here, post titles are especially important. Often times because with controversy often attracts trolls, and if your post title doesn't exactly reflect your point, you run the risk that the trolls will bomb your post with nasty comments without actually reading the post, or worse, looking for a way to twist your words. This post, when I read the title, I took a deep breath. Knowing how hot this topic is, and also knowing how the body image conversation has focused on a particular body type in the past few years, I could see frustration.
in fashion popular, trendy (Brit. informal), all the rage, hip (slang), in (informal), latest, the new, happening (informal), current, modern, cool (slang), with it (informal), usual, smart, prevailing, fashionable, stylish, chic, up-to-date, customary, genteel, in vogue, up-to-the-minute, modish, du jour (French), à la mode, voguish (informal), trendsetting, all the go (informal), culty That sort of dress is in fashion again.
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