Born in January of 1905, this French designer was best known for his distinctive “New Look” silhouette. First shown in 1947; his suits and dresses revolutionized the way women dressed after the Second World War. Today, talented designer John Galliano carries on the legendary designer’s legacy in Paris, where he creates dramatic couture ball gowns, chic prêt-a-porter, and luxurious accessories for Dior. Galliano’s talent and his over-the-top runway shows have ensured that the brand remains strong and viable in today’s world…
Casual is a combination of elegance with comfort. This simple style has caught up well with the passage of time and is one of the most sought after fashion styles as of now. None of the exotic and bold items will be in the wardrobe of a woman who follows casual fashion. They would prefer to put on a white T-Shirt and black pants over tight and uncomfortable exotics any day. They tend to keep it simple and match the accessories with whatever the simple clothing they are wearing. See Causal look shopping on Christmas Season.
Lace is a fairly safe bet each and every autumn/winter, but for 2019, it has been used in so many ultra-pretty ways that we wanted to share. From layered over shirting (Prada) to ruffle upon red ruffle for party dresses (Erdem) and as negligées for day (Philosophy), we imagine this classic fabric trend will not only infiltrate your evening wardrobe but your day one too. Even Victoria Beckham is behind it, so we're ready and waiting to see how she styles it our IRL, perhaps at the airport…
Jean-Paul Gaultier is a French fashion designer born on 1952 in Val-de-Marne, France. At age 18, he joined the house of Pierre Cardin before moving on to Jacques Esterel and Patou. The appearance of Gaultier’s collection was in 1976, but his own design house was only launched on 1982. Jean Paul Gaultier‘s sensual, irreverent style continually challenges stereotypical femininity, ignoring traditional gender roles by embracing androgyny and the freedom of sexuality. His style is known to challenge standard views of fashion.
To start designing it is important to understand the construction techniques to create basic skirts, bodices, jackets and coats, sleeves, trousers and collars. It is the key elements that form Western dress. To create a three dimensional shape on the figure and illustrate contemporary fashion design should know basic garment cutting and fitting method. Also follow the two-dimensional planning of construction, fastenings, performance and movement.
Everyone knows this guy, and I bet you do, too. He’s one of the international fashion icons. Yves Saint Laurent became popular as a designer who re-designed menswear into feminine, beautiful garments for women. His name is also closely associated with the phenomenon of ‘ready-to-wear’ fashion clothing, ‘power suits’ for women and ‘smoking jackets’ for men.

Although many autumn colour trends abound (as you can see from the first section of this trend report), I kept noticing the exact pairing of red and pink together too—ideal when the two hues have been en vogue for such a long time now and you're likely to have them sitting somewhere in your closet. From dusky combinations at Anne Demeulemeester through to vibrant partners at Balenciaga, there are many ways this trend can play out. Over to you, pals.

A pattern maker (also referred as pattern master or pattern cutter) drafts the shapes and sizes of a garment's pieces. This may be done manually with paper and measuring tools or by using a CAD computer software program. Another method is to drape fabric directly onto a dress form. The resulting pattern pieces can be constructed to produce the intended design of the garment and required size. Formal training is usually required for working as a pattern marker.

The first true “Chanel suit” was produced in 1925; Coco used chains to weigh down the fabric, so that it hung “just so”. She favored ornamentation such as ribbons, pretty buttons, and ropes of pearls. Her feminine touches added style and impact to her wearable designs; in fact, even vintage Chanel designs remain remarkably timeless and easy to wear.
Although many autumn colour trends abound (as you can see from the first section of this trend report), I kept noticing the exact pairing of red and pink together too—ideal when the two hues have been en vogue for such a long time now and you're likely to have them sitting somewhere in your closet. From dusky combinations at Anne Demeulemeester through to vibrant partners at Balenciaga, there are many ways this trend can play out. Over to you, pals.
Edited's data plays into the trend too. The analysts saw a rise in ultra-feminine themes with floral patterns being particularly key. Out of the total floral-print offering, 40% of the items were dresses in both the UK and the U.S. Some of our personal favourites? Paco Rabanne (especially when paired with a cute cardigan), Prada (so many different, weird and wonderful takes on a very classic idea) and Richard Quinn (literally every editor cried at his show because the jaw-dropping dresses combined with live music from Freya Ridings was just too much beauty to handle).

One of the world’s most successful fashion designers, Diane von Fürstenberg impressed the fashion world when she introduced her now-iconic “wrap dress” for the working woman in 1972. Elegance, ease, and accessibility have always been the core of her design philosophy, which has allowed her to turn DVF into a global luxury lifestyle brand. In 2005, she became the recipient of the CFDA’s Lifetime Achievement Award.


If there's one styling trick that was put on the map at the tail end of 2018 and looks set to continue well into this winter, it's the idea of the double jumper, or scrumper, as we called it (because it's essentially about tying another jumper around your neck as a scarf). The concept has extended even further since then, with many designer using super-cosy knits from head to toe. The chicest and easiest way to do it is with the same colour or pattern.


I love Valentino, Tom Ford, Mary Quant, Yohi Yamamato and Donna Karen. I pull from these guys a lot for my cosplay. No, that isn’t sacrilege. Cosplay cannot be ignored as far as a money making design market goes. Top designs have trickled into cosplay and cosplay has trickled into top designs. There is just no way around it. Nor should there be. 🙂
I don’t know what style category I fit into. I seem to have casual, sexy, girly, punk and tomboy. I even like the sporty style. It actually depends on my mood but most of the time, I like romantic clothes with lace, chic stuff, and if I don’t feel like dressing up, I just want casual or tomboy. Usually with crop tops and high waisted jeans. What….am I???
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