In 1966 Paco Rabanne opened his own outlet at the age of 32, where he earned international repute for his metal-linked plastic-disc dresses, sun goggles and jewelry made of plastic in primary colors. Paco Rabanne’s dresses made of small plastic tiles linked together by chains, stole the show in Paris. His first collection, titled “12 Unwearable Dresses in Contemporary Materials,” sums up his philosophy that “the only new frontier left in fashion is the finding of new materials.” Throughout his career, Rabanne experimented with everything from plastic and aluminum to fiberglass and paper to create futuristic, eccentric, yet highly influential garments.
Inspiration board is a references and research framework for your design. Designer collects different inspirational images, words, and objects (fabric, colour, textures,trims, paint chips, packaging, etc.) that are organize and keep at hand as a reference for starting a fashion design. It can be made in the form of a paper poster, a bulletin board, a digital graphic, or a video.
If there's one thing that guaranteed Instagram likes all year thus far, it's hair accessories. Whether giant padded headbands or cutesy diamanté clips, the enthusiasm for this outfit add-on shows no sign of slowing down for autumn/winter and the accompanying party season. We were particularly enamoured with the most outré options, like Simone Rocha's crystal tiaras or Alessandra Rich's marabou halos.

Half-way garments are an alternative to ready-to-wear, "off-the-peg", or prêt-à-porter fashion. Half-way garments are intentionally unfinished pieces of clothing that encourages co-design between the "primary designer" of the garment, and what would usually be considered, the passive "consumer"[5]. This differs from ready-to-wear fashion, as the consumer is able to participate in the process of making and co-designing their clothing. During the Make{able} workshop, Hirscher and Niinimaki found that personal involvement in the garment-making process created a meaningful “narrative” for the user, which established a person-product attachment and increased the sentimental value of the final product.[5]


Fashion designers work in different ways. Some sketch their ideas on paper, while others drape fabric on a dress form. When a designer is completely satisfied with the fit of the toile (or muslin), he or she will consult a professional pattern maker who then makes the finished, working version of the pattern out of card or via a computerized system. Finally, a sample garment is made up and tested on a model to make sure it is an operational outfit.


Currently the fashion industry relies more on mass market sales. The mass market caters for a wide range of customers, producing ready-to-wear garments using trends set by the famous names in fashion. They often wait around a season to make sure a style is going to catch on before producing their own versions of the original look. To save money and time, they use cheaper fabrics and simpler production techniques which can easily be done by machine. The end product can therefore be sold much more cheaply.[7][8][9]

Long vests, which the planners have been playing around with for a couple of seasons now, are perfect for the pre-fall season, particularly in light of the way that pre-fall is the season for outerwear that you have been so amped up for. A possibility for the 70’s jackets and overcoats, long vests have a diminishing effect on the body, especially when left detached. They can be worn in the pre-fall September isolated, displaying the revealed arms, with sweater when it gets colder, or even used for a layered look.
One of our favorite italian fashion designers, Miuccia Prada was once a member of the Italian Communist Party and a mime student. She was an unlikely entrepreneur when she took over her family’s luggage business in 1978. She first dazzled the fashion world in 1985 with a series of black nylon handbags and backpacks. Prada is now a billion-dollar company. Beginning with Prada’s first ready-to-wear collection in 1989, she established a techno minimalism based on pared-down design, innovative fabrics, and computer-enhanced patterns that have become influentially iconic.
An homage to Karl Lagerfeld or just a coincidence, bouclé and tweeds are back on the fashion menu and looking particularly natty in jacket form. It's a trend we know the high street does well (Zara are particularly skilled in this department), so I'd imagine this will become available at a lower price point and may take the place of your parka/biker/bombers when it comes to flinging a jacket over any given outfit. You could go the whole nine yards and wear it with a matching skirt (see Gucci) or dress (Brock Collection), but we also liked Louis Vuitton's leather trousers idea. 
It was during this period that many design houses began to hire artists to sketch or paint designs for garments. The images were shown to clients, which was much cheaper than producing an actual sample garment in the workroom. If the client liked their design, they ordered it and the resulting garment made money for the house. Thus, the tradition of designers sketching out garment designs instead of presenting completed garments on models to customers began as an economy.
It’s not hard to point out a gal that wears the cowgirl fashion style! In this particular style, there’s a few staples that are an absolute must for the wardrobe: undoubtedly an adorable cowgirl hat, typically in either some shade of brown or pink, a pair of flared blue jeans with western themed leather belt, denim jacket to match, a pair of cowgirl boots, and a few white t-shirt and plaid button-ups.
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