Fashion designer Issey Miyake used new technology to create innovative textiles with both Eastern and Western influences for his clothing line. Issey Miyake was born on April 22, 1938, in Hiroshima, Japan. In the 1960s, he designed for Givenchy in Paris, after which he designed for Geoffrey Bean in Manhattan. In 1970, Miyake started his own design studio. During the 1970s, he toyed with avant-garde Eastern designs. In the 1980s, he began using technology new East meets West textiles.

A pattern maker (also referred as pattern master or pattern cutter) drafts the shapes and sizes of a garment's pieces. This may be done manually with paper and measuring tools or by using a CAD computer software program. Another method is to drape fabric directly onto a dress form. The resulting pattern pieces can be constructed to produce the intended design of the garment and required size. Formal training is usually required for working as a pattern marker.

Every collection of this talented designer is doomed for success. His works can be unhesitatingly called masterpieces: he’s never afraid of expressing himself in the wackiest, the most sophisticated, out-of-this-world shapes and colors. Pierre Cardin is the inventor of the ‘bubble dress’. His works can be easily told from the others: Cardin’s models look like they’ve come out from the SCI-FI novels :).
Born in August of 1883, Gabrielle Chanel was a French native who was destined to liberate women from the constraints of corsets and other uncomfortable garments. A true rebel and visionary, Chanel, who changed her name to Coco after a brief career as a singer, preferred to wear clothes she could move freely in; often, her style were imbued with a mannish aesthetic. Indeed, Coco Chanel, who designed her first cardigan to avoid pulling any garment over her head, was really the originator of modern women’s sportswear. Her desire for freedom and self-expression gave women style without sacrifice…
In addition to bovver boots, a treasure trove of key pieces to plunder awaits you: Some you may own already (dig out that camel sweater), but a few entirely new-looking items will probably be worth the hype (that JW Anderson trench coat is going to sell out so fast). We chart those below, as well as all of the teeny-tiny details that make a difference, like a choker necklace—they're back—as well as the most of-the-moment colours, prints, fabrics, silhouettes, formulas and overarching themes that make up autumn/winter 2019's top trends. From dark floral dresses (Paco Rabanne wins) to the kind of tights every fashion girl will wear when the centigrade drops (with crystals on, please), here's what's what for autumn.
Gingham designs, both extensive and little, are drifting examples of 2019, as is the vast and ostentatious flower design. For the monochrome darlings, there’s make a beeline for toe white, simply holding up to enamour, or the military green that runs with look, from slouchy to thin. Sews and midi-skirts are among the fall patterns, as are the immortal hides and tufts. Toss in an obi belt or favor cook’s garments for a more runway take a gander at the parlor party. Hotshot some skin with some mid-riff exposing, or play with the creative ability with the edges. Comfortable pads are in, as is bouffant. In this way, go out there and blend it up. So imagine a scenario in which you can’t wear Vogue, Chanel or Louis Vuitton. Get motivated, at any rate, and enjoy a trendy 2019. Be excellent.

Ralph  joined the fashion industry as a tie seller. He tried to introduce his own tie designs for the company, but his enthusiasm wasn’t perceived well. So, he left the company and launched his own mini-business: he sewed his first ties out of rags and distributed them to small shops. The most defining order of 100 dozens of ties by Neiman Marcus has radically changed Ralph’s life. He expanded his business by introducing menswear and womenswear lines. Currently his brand is worth $7.5 billion. Ralph Lauren’s success story inspires many novice designers. The first Polo logo was introduced in 1970.


Although the '70s aesthetic is visible in some corners of planet fashion for autumn 2019, in general, the look hasn't taken hold in quite the same way it has in previous years. However, the item that really has infiltrated from this epoch is platform shoes. Whether in rubbed-soled pull-on boot form at Stella McCartney or in curvaceous lizard print at Alexa Chung, this is a good time for super-high-heel lovers. They can be worn with anything and everything, and they shouldn't be saved for retro looks only—try a pair with your favourite straight-leg jeans and see what we mean.
Teddy-bear coats rose to fashion fame last year, reportedly being 1000% more popular than the winter prior. And now the ongoing trend for fur alternatives powers on, generating fluffy things for every part of your look. Chubby coats in neutral colours will undoubtedly be the most wearable part of this all-encompassing trend, but don't be surprised if your fashion friends start wearing shoes with shearling on the outside rather than the lining, or a mad winter hat rendered from shaggy faux fur.

Yves Saint Laurent started his brand in 1962 after working at the house of Dior, where he was famously appointed head designer at young age 21. Many of fashion’s most iconic creations can be attributed to YSL, including the women’s tuxedo jacket, the high-fashion peacoat, and the shirt dress. In addition to iconic clothing, he was also among the first designers to feature non-white models. Yves stayed at the brand until his retirement in 2002. He died in June 2008.

Women who enjoy the artsy style tend to stay away from the traditional ‘trends’ of the fashion world and love to make a statement with their clothing. Oftentimes they will be the creator of their own fashions, designing and creating their own blouses, hats, and jackets. Each artsy style will be different per woman, as everyone has their own idea of what ‘art’ truly is. That’s what makes this particular fashion style so unconventional and interesting.
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