Every collection of this talented designer is doomed for success. His works can be unhesitatingly called masterpieces: he’s never afraid of expressing himself in the wackiest, the most sophisticated, out-of-this-world shapes and colors. Pierre Cardin is the inventor of the ‘bubble dress’. His works can be easily told from the others: Cardin’s models look like they’ve come out from the SCI-FI novels :).
Ready-to-wear, or prêt-à-porter, clothes are a cross between haute couture and mass market. They are not made for individual customers, but great care is taken in the choice and cut of the fabric. Clothes are made in small quantities to guarantee exclusivity, so they are rather expensive. Ready-to-wear collections are usually presented by fashion houses each season during a period known as Fashion Week. This takes place on a citywide basis and occurs twice a year. The main seasons of Fashion Week include: spring/summer, fall/winter, resort, swim, and bridal.

The India’s dearest and beloved designer, known & appreciated not only by Bollwood’s-leading-ladies and men but also designs for Hollywood-superstars like Reese-Witherspoon and supermodels Naomi-Campbell nd Kate-Moss. He’s the one who brought vivacity, energy and colors to blockbuster movies like kuch-kuch-hota-hai, Dil-to-pagal-hai….He was also asked to design-clothes for Michael Jackson. He’s linked with the top international companies of Thai-Gems & Jewellers Association, Deutche-Bank, American-Express-Bank, Wizcraft, Moet and Henessey..

Until the 1950s, fashion clothing was predominately designed and manufactured on a made-to-measure or haute couture basis (French for high-sewing), with each garment being created for a specific client. A couture garment is made to order for an individual customer, and is usually made from high-quality, expensive fabric, sewn with extreme attention to detail and finish, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques. Look and fit take priority over the cost of materials and the time it takes to make.[2][3] Due to the high cost of each garment, haute couture makes little direct profit for the fashion houses, but is important for prestige and publicity.[4]
An homage to Karl Lagerfeld or just a coincidence, bouclé and tweeds are back on the fashion menu and looking particularly natty in jacket form. It's a trend we know the high street does well (Zara are particularly skilled in this department), so I'd imagine this will become available at a lower price point and may take the place of your parka/biker/bombers when it comes to flinging a jacket over any given outfit. You could go the whole nine yards and wear it with a matching skirt (see Gucci) or dress (Brock Collection), but we also liked Louis Vuitton's leather trousers idea. 
Calvin Klein studied fashion in New York and apprenticed for a suit manufacturer. In 1968, he opened his own company that was initially recognized for suits and coats, but his sportswear line became popular and top of the line. He received three Coty Awards for womenswear. His business now includes clothing, cosmetics, fragrances and home collections.
In fact, Schiaparelli’s designs were often all too simple to copy, unlike the work of her chief rival, Coco Chanel. After World War II, Schiaparelli, who had lived in New York during the war, returned to Paris and found a different sensibility among its people. The post-war desire for simplicity and practicality made the unique embellishments of her designs less popular, and the endless knock-offs also cut into her profits.
Shortly thereafter, he began to work closely with Christian Dior, who was nearing the end of his life. Dior recognized the skill and creativity of his young protégé, and he chose him as his successor. When Dior died of a heart attack, Saint Laurent found himself holding the reins of one of France’s most venerable fashion houses: he was only 21 years of age.
Vivienne Westwood, the godmother of punk, is considered one of the most unconventional and outspoken fashion designers in the world. Westwood’s fashions woke to fame in the late 1970s when her early designs helped shape the look of the punk rock movement. The highly influential shop changed its name and décor with every collection, and would later be credited for setting off both the punk trend and the new romantic wave. In 1981, Westwood launched her signature collection and has since continued to shock and amuse the fashion world with her hard-core Anglomania.
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In 1966 Paco Rabanne opened his own outlet at the age of 32, where he earned international repute for his metal-linked plastic-disc dresses, sun goggles and jewelry made of plastic in primary colors. Paco Rabanne’s dresses made of small plastic tiles linked together by chains, stole the show in Paris. His first collection, titled “12 Unwearable Dresses in Contemporary Materials,” sums up his philosophy that “the only new frontier left in fashion is the finding of new materials.” Throughout his career, Rabanne experimented with everything from plastic and aluminum to fiberglass and paper to create futuristic, eccentric, yet highly influential garments.
Preppy girls, often named simply ‘preps’, love to rock a college-inspired wardrobe. Their hangers are lined side to side with girly blouses with matching collared tees as well as a-line skirts and tights. Her hair is almost always amped up with a cute little headband and she usually wears glasses- whether she really needs to or not! This style may appear geeky and slightly luxurious, but the look itself is really not expensive and extravagant at all.
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