Gabrielle“Coco” Bonheur Chanel is probably the most reputable fashion designer of all time. She is a very exceptional, hard-working woman who has managed to found the famous Chanel brand. The key things she tries to convey in her designs are simplicity, practicality and elegance. Coco is one of the most influential figure of the 20th century. Her ideas are very modernistic and brave, and her models are still the benchmark in simplicity and elegance.
When Christian Dior launched his “New Look” collection in 1947 he radically changed the direction of mid-century fashion, bringing the world a new idea of luxury from post-war Paris. Bustier bodices, bell-shaped skirts, rounded shoulders and cinched waists made Dior’s work different and irreverent. Dior took the world by storm, never producing an unpopular collection during his administratcion as the head of Dior brand.
The India’s dearest and beloved designer, known & appreciated not only by Bollwood’s-leading-ladies and men but also designs for Hollywood-superstars like Reese-Witherspoon and supermodels Naomi-Campbell nd Kate-Moss. He’s the one who brought vivacity, energy and colors to blockbuster movies like kuch-kuch-hota-hai, Dil-to-pagal-hai….He was also asked to design-clothes for Michael Jackson. He’s linked with the top international companies of Thai-Gems & Jewellers Association, Deutche-Bank, American-Express-Bank, Wizcraft, Moet and Henessey..
Over in London, things were distinctly more aggressive: Punk and themes of dissonance could be felt strongly (Brexit, much?), with plenty of tartan, more safety pins than even Johnny Rotten could handle and Vivienne Westwood staging an entire protest about climate change for her show. The strong mood could clearly be felt over the Channel, too, as British designer Sarah Burton's vision for Alexander McQueen this coming season established the poshest and most brilliantly executed iteration on punk we've seen in a long, long time. And talking of being combative, if you don't pick up on the "army" theme of many of the season's biggest shows (Bottega Veneta, Chloé, Miu Miu) and end up buying a pair of combat boots, I'll eat my bucket hat.
Fashion designer Issey Miyake used new technology to create innovative textiles with both Eastern and Western influences for his clothing line. Issey Miyake was born on April 22, 1938, in Hiroshima, Japan. In the 1960s, he designed for Givenchy in Paris, after which he designed for Geoffrey Bean in Manhattan. In 1970, Miyake started his own design studio. During the 1970s, he toyed with avant-garde Eastern designs. In the 1980s, he began using technology new East meets West textiles.
Until the 1950s, fashion clothing was predominately designed and manufactured on a made-to-measure or haute couture basis (French for high-sewing), with each garment being created for a specific client. A couture garment is made to order for an individual customer, and is usually made from high-quality, expensive fabric, sewn with extreme attention to detail and finish, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques. Look and fit take priority over the cost of materials and the time it takes to make.[2][3] Due to the high cost of each garment, haute couture makes little direct profit for the fashion houses, but is important for prestige and publicity.[4]
The bohemian fashion style- always referred to commonly as the ‘boho’ look- can easily be described as a style that focuses mainly on wild and intricate patterns and exotic textures. They get most of their inspiration from gypsys and hippies, creating a standout finish with plenty of tie dye, geometrics, chains, fringes, and other eye-catching designs.
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