A stylist co-ordinates the clothes, jewelry, and accessories used in fashion photography and catwalk presentations. A stylist may also work with an individual client to design a coordinated wardrobe of garments. Many stylists are trained in fashion design, the history of fashion, and historical costume, and have a high level of expertise in the current fashion market and future market trends. However, some simply have a strong aesthetic sense for pulling great looks together.
"Between tonal dressing and statement knitwear, head-to-toe knits have been brought to the forefront. I appreciate the cosy yet chic approach to cold-weather dressing," says Aiken, who happens to the one of the first industry figures spotted in this trend all those months ago. "Gabriela Hearst’s knit poncho paired over a matching skirt and sweater best exemplifies this look."
Until the 1950s, fashion clothing was predominately designed and manufactured on a made-to-measure or haute couture basis (French for high-sewing), with each garment being created for a specific client. A couture garment is made to order for an individual customer, and is usually made from high-quality, expensive fabric, sewn with extreme attention to detail and finish, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques. Look and fit take priority over the cost of materials and the time it takes to make.[2][3] Due to the high cost of each garment, haute couture makes little direct profit for the fashion houses, but is important for prestige and publicity.[4]
In the fashion industry designers are responsible for designing the range and for providing design direction to the buyer. They would work with the buyer regarding previous best sellers in the range and consider this when producing new styles. Before making any decision designer follow merchandisers or best sellers data, consider about the upto-date trend information, fashion direction, buyer and merchandiser feedback, finally maintain consumer and market demands. Decisions are constantly being made but are always informed.
As a rule, world’s famous fashion designers have their place in the fashion industry for a long time. Each of them has a luxury fashion house with their admirers, as well as characteristic iconic images, seen in all collections. Coco Chanel with her tweed suit or Valentino with his striking red dresses, the best fashion designers clothing are credited only those who created his own distinctive style, which entered the history of fashion. Here 10 people awarded with the title of “best.”
Automation (6) CAD (2) Calculation (1) Career (6) Clothing (11) Color (2) Color Fastness (1) Computer (4) Consumption (10) Costing (7) Cutting (5) Cutting Machine (3) Defects (13) Denim (9) Dyeing (12) Dyes and Chemicals (2) ERP (3) Fabric (2) Fashion (8) Fashion Accessories (11) Fashion Design (9) Fashion Industry (5) Fashion Merchandising (2) Fashion Trends (2) Fiber (8) Finishing Machine (3) Garment Accessories (9) Garment Finishing (14) Garment Industry (19) Garment Wash (8) Garments Production (22) GSM (2) IE (26) Inspection (9) Knitting (8) Knitting Machine (4) Loom (2) Marker (3) Mercerizing (1) Merchandising (15) Needle (1) Pattern (8) Planning (12) Pretreatment (5) Printing (10) Printing Machine (1) Quality Control (19) Sample (3) Seamless Garment (1) Sewing (12) Sewing Machine (6) Sewing Thread (2) Smart Textiles (1) Special Garments (1) Spinning (3) Tailoring (1) Technical Textile (7) Testing Machine (2) Textile Book (1) Textile Design (2) Textile Finishing (3) Textile Industry (8) Textile Recycling (1) Textile Testing (4) Top 10 (10) Undergarment (3) Visual Merchandising (6) Weaving (2) Wool (2) Yarn (9) Yarn Count (4)
A vibrant fashion style is reserved for the lady who wants to say “Hey, look at ME, world!” This energetic and intense fashion style typically features garments with wild patterns and exaggerated embroidery as well as asymmetrical designs and tons of colors. Most of her wardrobe will be lined with super light and pastel colors that draw the attention of everyone’s eyes, no matter where it’s worn.
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